Diesel fuel: arctic, winter, summer

Diesel fuel is one of the main types of fuel used in industry and agriculture.  One of the major drawbacks of its use is the need of transition from summer to winter types and vice versa at a significant change in weather conditions.  The main difference is in the ambient temperature limit at which diesel fuel still has the required performance properties.  For example, winter-type diesel fuel can be used at -30°C.  For areas with severe climate, arctic diesel fuel is recommended; it preserves its quality even at -50°C.

Theoretically, summer diesel fuel can be distinguished from winter diesel fuel by its color, but in practice it is not so simple.  The main difference is its kinematic viscosity. This indicator is lower for winter diesel fuel due to the difference in its fraction composition.

Many drivers are tempted by the lower wholesale price for summer diesel fuel.  As a result, there are cases when vehicles are filled with summer-type fuel in winter time.  There is no point in doing this, even if you live in a region with relatively warm climate where ambient temperatures rarely fall below zero throughout the year.  The problem is that diesel fuel contains a lot of sulfur and paraffin.  It has practically no effect in summer, but in freezing temperatures, summer diesel fuel begins to thicken due to precipitation of paraffin crystals.  As a result, the engine runs very poorly.  Also, below -10°C, freezing of summer fuel is possible with the formation of ice in fuel lines.

To reduce sulfur content and for cleaning diesel fuels of various impurities, it is recommended to use UVR-type plants produced by GlobeCore.  This equipment allows to clarify diesel fuel, remove hydrogen sulfide compounds, reduce sulfur and paraffins concentration and remove unsaturated hydrocarbons.  After processing in UVR-type plants, diesel fuel does not oxidize or darken again.

обновлено: October 12, 2016 автором: dannik